Correlational finding on Happiness and Approval seeking
Subject code: P05ah

StudyPhillips & Clancy (1971): study US Various places 1967
TitleSome Effects of "Social Desirability" in Survey Studies.
SourceAmerican Journal of Sociology, 1971/72, Vol. 77, 921 - 940
Public21+ aged general public, New England and Mid-Atlantic States, USA, 197?
Sample
Non-Response-
Respondents N =404

Correlate
Author's labelNeed for social approval
Page in Source 929 n
Our classificationApproval seeking, code P05ah
Operationalization
10-item index of the true/false statements, such as: 'I 
never hesitate to go out of my way to help someone in 
trouble' and 'There have been times when I feel like 
rebelling against people in authority' (shortened 
Social Desirability scale; see Crowne & Marlowe, 1964)

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aaG=+.24 p < . 01
G' based on proportion 'very happy'


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aaSelfreport on single question:

Taken all together, how would you say things are these days? Would you say that you are....?
3 very happy
2 pretty happy
1 not too happy


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
GGOODMAN & Kruskal's GAMMA
Type: test statistic
Measurement level: Correlate: ordinal, Happinessl: ordinal
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
G = 0 no rank correlation
G = +1 strongest possible rank correlation, where high correlate values correspond to high happiness ratings.
G = -1 strongest possible rank correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness ratings.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl