print

Correlational findings

Study Rosenberg (1962): study US 1960

Public:
High school pupils, New York, USA,1960
Sample:
Respondents:
N = 1618
Non Response:
1% because of inadequate answers
Assessment:
Questionnaire: paper

Correlate

Authors's label
Religious dissonanceof social context
Our Classification
Operationalization
0 Mixed/Consonant
1 Dissonant neighbourhood

The neighbourhood were one lived (longest) when one grew up was rated as either "dissonant" or "consonant" on the basis of a direct open question on the religious affiliation of most of the people in that neighbourhood (more than 50% different from ones own religion rated "dissonant", less than 50% "mixed" or "consonant").

Observed Relation with Happiness

Happiness Measure Statistics Elaboration / Remarks M-AO-g-mq-v-5-a G = -.24 p < .01 Stronger among Protestants and Jews than among Catholics (G' respectively -.40, -.36, -.07).

Lower when controlled for recall of prejudice experience.

Variable with cultural similarity:
-Catholics who grew up in Protestant area happier
than those who grew up in Jewish area,
-Protestants who grew up in Catholic area happier
than those who grew up in Jewish area,
-Jews who grew up in Protestant area happier than
those who grew up in Catholic area.
M-AO-g-mq-v-5-a tb = -.08