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Studies

Layard et al. (2013): study GB 2004

Publication

Author(s):
Layard, R.; Clark, A.E.; Powdthavee, N
Title:
What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being.
Source:
CEP Discussion Paper, 2013, No. 1245, London, UK

Investigation

Public:
34 aged, United Kingdom, followed from childhood, 2004
Survey name:
UK-British Cohort Study
Sample:
Non-probability purposive sample
Respondents:
N = 8868
Non Response:
Assessment:
Interview: face-to-face

Happiness Measure(s) and Distributional Findings

Full text:
Selfreport on single question:

Here is a scale from 0 to 10. On it, "0" means that you are completely dissatisfied and "10 " means that you are completely satisfied. Please ring ONE number to show just how dissatisfied or satisfied you are about the way your life has turned out so far
0  completely dissatisfied
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 completely satisfied
Classification:
O-SLC-h-sq-n-11-bb
Author's label:
Life satisfaction
Page in publication:
4

Correlational Findings

Author's label Subject Description Finding Emotional health Earlier mental health Income (ln) Current income level (unspecified) Educational achievement Current education Employed Current employment status Self-perceived health Self-perceived health Intellectual performance Earlier intelligence Family economic Socio-economic background (earlier for adults, current for young) Family psychosocial Earlier family situation Female Sex (male vs female) Summed effects of childhood and adulthood Summed effects of life-career conditions Social class of father Socio-economic background (earlier for adults, current for young) Number of siblings Number of siblings Employment rate of father Unemployment of parents Age when mother left full time education Parents education Age when father left full time education Parents education Mother's average mental health at 5 and 10 Mental health of parents Post-marital conception Conditions of conception Both natural parents live in household at 10 Presence of parents Family weekly income at 10 Socio-economic background (earlier for adults, current for young) Good conduct in childhood Earlier aggression
Earlier criminal behaviour
Earlier mental health
Earlier personality traits
Good conduct at adulthood Earlier aggression
Earlier criminal behaviour
Earlier mental health
Earlier personality traits
Has partner Married state (compared to non-married states)