Correlational finding on Happiness and Self-perceived health
Subject code: H14ab02

StudyMichalos & Zumbo (2002): study CA Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan 1999
TitleHealthy Days, Healthy Satisfaction and Satisfacton with the Overall Quality of Life.
SourceSocial Indicators Research, 2002, Vol. 59, 321 - 338
DOIDOI: 10.1023/A:1019601213926
PublicAdults, general public, British Columbia, Canada, 1999
SampleProbability simple random sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =1468

Correlate
Author's labelGeneral Health
Page in Source 324
Our classificationSelf-perceived health, code H14ab02
Operationalization
Would you say that in general your health is
(a) excellent
(b) very good
(c) good
(d) fair
(e) poor
Please circle letter indicating the state of your 
health
Observed distributionM = 2.4

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-SQL-u-sq-n-7-ar=+.36 p < .01


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-SQL-u-sq-n-7-aSelfreport on single question:

On a 7-point scale from 1 indicating 'very satisfied and 7 indicating 'very dissatisfied', how would you rate your level of satisfaction with your overall quality of life?
1 very dissatisfied
2
3
4
5
6
7 very satisfied


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl