Correlational finding on Happiness and Scores on symptom inventories
Subject code: H13ab02b

StudyHeadey & Wearing (1992): study AU AU Victoria 1981
TitleUnderstanding Happiness: A Theory of Subjective Well-Being.
SourceLongman Cheshire, 1992, Melbourne, Australia
URLHTTP://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl/hap_bib/freetexts/headey_b_1992.pdf
Public18+ aged, general public, Victoria, Australia, 1981-1989
SampleProbability stratified sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =502

Correlate
Author's labelGHQ (General Health Questionnaire)
Page in Source 42
Our classificationScores on symptom inventories, code H13ab02b
Operationalization
Selfreport on 12 questions:
Items concern both affect and symptoms: e.g. 'felt 
constantly under strain'; 'lost much sleep over worry') 
measure the risk of neurosis.
Goldberg; 1978, Manual of the General Health 
Questionnaire(NFER, Windsor)

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
M-FH-g-sq-n-11-ar=-.46


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
M-FH-g-sq-n-11-aSelfreport on single question:

"Generally speaking, how (much) do you feel happy? What score do you give if we put ten for 'extremely happy, zero for extremely unhappy' and five for neither happy nor unhappy'?"
10 extremely happy
9
8
7
6
5 neither happy nor unhappy
4
3
2
1
0 extremely unhappy


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl