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Correlational findings

Study Ek et al. (2008): study FI Northern Finland 1997

Public:
31-aged general public, Finland, 1997-1998
Survey name:
FI-Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort
Sample:
Respondents:
N = 5696
Non Response:
21%
Assessment:
Questionnaire: paper

Correlate

Authors's label
Active coping strategies
Our Classification
Operationalization
Respondents indicated a recent stressful event and then rate their frequency of use of 16 different coping responses.
Rated:
1: Used in a few cases
2: Used in some cases
3: Used a lot (reference)

The 16 coping-reponses were classified into two coping dimensions:
a) passive coping (i.e., efforts to control the stress-related emotions but not the stressful situation)
b) active coping (i.e., taking specific actions to deal directly with a situation).

Observed Relation with Happiness

Happiness Measure Statistics Elaboration / Remarks O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-d OR = 1.96 p < .05 USED IN SOME CASES (vs used a lot)
Men: No controls
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-d OR = 1.37 ns Men, OR controlled for:
- education
- employment history
- migration history
- social support
- passive coping strategies
- attitude towards the future
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-d OR = 1.95 p < .05 Women: No controls

or when additionally controlled for:
- education
- employment history
- migration history
- social support
- passive coping strategies
- attitude towards the future
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-d OR = 3.66 p < .05 USED IN FEW CASES (vs used a lot)
Men: No controls
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-d OR = 3.07 p < .05 WOMEN: No controls

or when additionally controlled for:
- education
- employment history
- migration history
- social support
- passive coping strategies
- attitude towards the future

Odds ratio of 1 means equal happiness, a higher odds ratio than 1 means less happiness, a lower odds ratio than 1 means higher happiness. So active coping is associated with less happiness.