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Correlational findings

Study Drobnic et al. (2010): study ZZ EU 9 2003

Public:
Working people, 9 European Union countries, 2003
Sample:
Respondents:
N = 3354
Non Response:
Assessment:
Interview: face-to-face

Correlate

Authors's label
Working hours
Our Classification
Operationalization
Weekly hours normally worked in the main job, including any paid or unpaid overtime.

Observed Relation with Happiness

Happiness Measure Statistics Elaboration / Remarks O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-b b = -.00 ns WORKING HOURS: LINEAR O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-b b = -.18 p < .05 WORKING HOURS: SQUARED (x1000)

B's controlled for:
- gender
- age in linear and in quadratic form
- marital status
- number of children
- education level
- objective working conditions
- subjective evaluations of work
O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-b b = +.02 p < .01 WORKING HOURS: LINEAR O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-b b = -.27 p < .01 WORKING HOURS: SQUARED (x1000)

B's additionally controlled for GDP per capita
O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-b b = +.02 p < .001 WORKING HOURS: LINEAR O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-b b = -.29 p < .001 WORKING HOURS: QUADRATIC (x1000)

B's additionally controlled for:
- GDP per capita
- country dummies
- job satisfaction
- work-home interference

Point of inflection is around 41 hours per week: for employees working less than roughly 41 hours per week, the model predicts a positive effect of an additional hour of work on life satisfaction, but when exceeding 41 hours, the effect changes direction and life satisfaction decreases.

In analysis of each country separately B's are only significant in Spain (linear +.06; squared (x1000) -.59) and Hungary (squared (x1000) -.64).