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Correlational findings

Study Dykstra & Wagner (2007): study DE 1990

Public:
70-100+ aged, West-Berlin, Germany 1990-1993
Sample:
Respondents:
N = 516
Non Response:
32%
Assessment:
Interview: face-to-face
Interviews in 14 sessions that covered mental and physical health, psychological functioning and social and economic situation.

Correlate

Authors's label
Occupational history, upward mobility
Our Classification
Operationalization
Difference in occupational prestige of first and last job.
0: No upward mobility (reference)
1: Upward mobility
   1a: Small upward mobility
   1b: Large upward mobility

Observed Relation with Happiness

Happiness Measure Statistics Elaboration / Remarks O-SLu-g-sq-n-5-a = SMALL UPWARD MOBILITY (vs no upward mobility) O-SLu-g-sq-n-5-a b = +.04 ns Males O-SLu-g-sq-n-5-a b = -.26 ns Females

B's controled for
-age
-parental history
-retirement career (exit age)
O-SLu-g-sq-n-5-a = LARGE UPWARD MOBILITY 9vs no upward mobility) O-SLu-g-sq-n-5-a b = +.03 ns Males O-SLu-g-sq-n-5-a b = -.07 ns Females

B's controled for
-age
-parental history
-retirement career (exit age)

Upward mobility has no impact on happiness of men, but a negative impact on happiness of women.