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Correlational findings

Study Ventegodt (1997): study DK 1993

Public:
31-33 aged, born at the university hospital, Denmark, 1993
Sample:
Respondents:
N = 4626
Non Response:
36%
Assessment:
Questionnaire: paper
Data were taken from the medical files of mothers and their babies

Correlate

Authors's Label
Blood-type at birth
Our Classification
Remarks
Humans have the following blood types along with their respective antigens and antibodies: Individuals with type A blood have red blood cells with antigen A on their surface and produce antibodies against antigen B in their blood serum. Therefore an A-negative person can only receive blood from another A-negative person or from an O-negative person. Individuals with type B blood have the opposite arrangement, antigen B on their cells and produce antibodies against antigen A in their serum. Therefore, a B-negative person can only receive blood from another B-negative person or from an O-negative person. Individuals with type AB blood have red blood cells with both antigens A and B and do not produce antibodies against either antigen in their serum. Therefore, a person with type AB-positive blood can safely receive any ABO type blood and is called a "universal receiver". However an AB-postive person cannot donate blood except to another AB-positive person. Individuals with type O blood have red blood cells with neither antigen but produce antibodies against both types of antigens. Therefore, a person with type O-negative blood can safely donate to a person with any ABO blood type and is called a "universal donor". However an O-negative person can only receive blood from another O-negative person. Overall, the O blood type is the most common blood type in the world, although in some areas, such as Sweden and Norway, the A group dominates. The A antigen is overall more common than the B antigen. Since the AB blood type requires the presence of both A and B antigens, the AB blood type is the rarest of the ABO blood types. There are known racial and geographic distributions of the ABO blood types.
Distribution
N all:1873,   a:40,8%,   b:40,7%,   c:9,9%,   d:4,5%,   e:1,7%,   f:0,4%,   g:2,0%
Operationalization
Blood-type at birth as reported in medical file
a: O without sensitization
b: A without sensitization
c: B without sensitization
d: AB without sensitization
e: A with sensitization
f: B with sensitization
g: transfusion because of jaundice without known cause

Observed Relation with Happiness

Happiness Measure Statistics Elaboration / Remarks A-AOL-m-sq-v-5-a DMt = ± a: Mt=7.81
b: Mt=7.61
c: Mt=7.84
d: Mt=7.76
e: Mt=7.83
f: Mt=8.13
g: Mt=8.35
All Mt=7.73
O-SLu-c-sq-v-5-e DMt = ± a: Mt=7.48
b: Mt=7.36
c: Mt=7.58
d: Mt=7.14
e: Mt=7.83
f: Mt=7.50
g: Mt=7.96
All Mt=7.40
O-HL-c-sq-v-5-ha DMt = ± a: Mt=7.14
b: Mt=6.91
c: Mt=7.08
d: Mt=7.11
e: Mt=7.34
f: Mt=7.50
g: Mt=7.30
All Mt=7.01